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October 24, 2014


In This Issue ...

I. State Forestry

1. Pennsylvania: Conservationists Defeated on Stream Buffers Legislation
2. Ohio: State Forest Logging Increases to Cover Budget Shortfall
3. West Virginia: DNR Tackles Another Stream Restoration Project
4. Georgia: State Forestry Collecting Acorns, Seeds
5. Montana: Swan River State Forest Active in Timber Harvest, Forest Management
6. Wisconsin: County OKs Storm Timber Sale
7. Arizona: Senators Say Slow Thinning Is Damaging Forest Industry

II. Federal Lands Management

1. USFS Northern Region Reaches Timber Harvest Goal
2. Federal Land Managers Draft Plan Confronting Climate Change
3. Roads Removed to Restore Forest Health
4. Managing Balance in the Forest

III. International Forestry News

1. Unlikely Partner Could Boost "Best Deal" for Protecting Forests, Slowing Climate Change
2. China Tests Outright Logging Ban in State Forests

IV. Forest Products Industry

1. Presidential Proclamation: National Forest Products Week
2. US Tall Wood Building Competition Announced
3. Local Firms Would Sell Wood-If They Had It
4. Bat Proposal Worries Black Hills Timber Industry
5. Sierra Pacific Seeks to Undo $47 Million Settlemen
6. Canada Files WTO Complaint about Chinese Wood Pulp Duties

V. Biomass

1. Biomass Proving a Cost-Effective Energy Solution
2. Op-Ed: Studies Steadily Advance Cellulosic Ethanol Prospects
3. Vega Biofuels Breaks Ground on Pilot Torrefaction Plant
4. CHP Plant Set for Florida Resort
5. Bioenergy Day Highlights Benefits of Heating with Wood

VI. Wildfire

1. Mobile Burn Unit Demonstrated in Ruidoso
2. When Firefighters Encounter Marijuana Growers
3. The Innovative, Unlikely Idea That Could Save America's Forests
4. Wildfire Fuel Reduction Efforts Continue in Carolina Forest

VII. Forest Pests

1. The Invasive Emerald Ash Borer Has Killed Millions of Trees, but Researchers Hope a Wasp Can Save Some of the Survivors
2. Chopping Down Trees Only Solution to Emerald Ash Borer
3. Emerald Ash Borer May Have Spread to Different Tree

VIII. Urban Forestry

1. Madison City Council Approves New Urban Forestry Fee
2. Ash Tree Removals in Madison Parks Spark Neighborhood Action
3. Students Tag Trees for Annual Appreciation Week

IX. Water Resources

1. Cable Logging Concerns Dominate Flagstaff Watershed Protection Comments
2. Trees vs. Humans: In California Drought, Nature Gets to Water First
3. Forestry Summit: "Rival" Agencies Come Together for Salmon, Water

X. Science and Research

1. Virginia Institute of Marine Science Researches Restoring Forested Wetlands
2. Satellites for Smart Logging
3. Climate Change Not Responsible for Altering Forest Tree Composition
4. If You Plant Different Trees in the Forest, Is It Still the Same Forest?
5. Microclimates May Buffer Some Streams from Global Warming
6. Scientists Study Fire's Effects on Rare Snake
7. Scientists Seek Survivor Ash Trees

XI. Items of Interest

1. Hal Salwasser, Former Dean of OSU's Forestry College Dies at 69
2. For Virginia Tech Expert, There's a Science to Fall Foliage
3. Popular Wilderness Area Requires Intensive Management to Remain Natural
4. Op-Eds by SAF Members

XII. SAF News

1. 2014 SAF Elections Ballot
2. Be Sure You Receive Your 2014 Election Ballot
3. SAF Launches New Membership Portal
4. Renew Your SAF Membership for 2015


I. State Forestry

1. Pennsylvania: Conservationists Defeated on Stream Buffers Legislation

Pocono Record.com (October 19) - A bill that would relax regulations on development near Pennsylvania's highest quality streams has pitted environmentalists against economic development advocates in Monroe County.

Earlier this week, the state House passed the Senate's amended version of House Bill 1565, which would eliminate the requirement for developers to implement a 150-foot buffer when building near streams. It awaits the governor's signature.

The bill specifically affects streams that have been identified as high quality or exceptional value. Eighty percent of the exceptional value streams in the state are in Monroe, Pike, and Wayne counties.

More:

HB 1565 Information from the Pennsylvania General Assembly website
To read the text of the bill, visit the Pennsylvania Senate website.

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2. Ohio: State Forest Logging Increases to Cover Budget Shortfall

NBC4i.com (October 21) - Shawnee State Forest along the Ohio River in Scioto County is being aggressively logged, a local watchdog group says.

However, according to the office of Chief of Forestry Robert Boyles, the Ohio Department of Natural Resources is logging 40 percent of the "new growth" or annual growth in our state forests. Last year three million board feet were cut while 18 million board feet grew, creating a surplus of 15 million board feet.

Over the past six years, the state has allowed loggers to cut more than 4,000 acres of forest timber in a 63,747-acre park with 48,000 acres available for harvest.

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3. West Virginia: DNR Tackles Another Stream Restoration Project

WVMetroNews.com (October 20) - The old adage says when life gives you lemons, make lemonade. For fisheries managers at the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources (DNR), when nature gives you twisted and broken timber, make fish habitat.

Superstorm Sandy and the 2012 Derecho left parts of Kumbrabow State Forest a tangled mess. Much of the downed timber from the two events landed in Mill Creek-a well-known native brook trout stream.

The agency already had its eye on Mill Creek for restoration, but the damage left from the two major storms prompted them to make the stream their next project. Beginning in June, employees from the DNR, West Virginia University, and the Division of Forestry went to work to tear out the debris jams and use pieces of the debris to create self-sustaining pools. The design created larger riffles and deeper pools, which encourages larger growth among the brook trout population in the creek.

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4. Georgia: State Forestry Collecting Acorns, Seeds

Dalton Daily Citizen.com (October 16) - Georgia Forestry Commission employees in Whitfield and Murray counties are locked in a heated battle with squirrels, at least for the moment.

Currently-and for about two months-foresters are stopping on roadsides, meandering through cemeteries, and rooting around forests to collect pounds of acorns and seeds produced by trees native to the region.

The acorn collections aren't to satisfy a vendetta with the squirrels, they are a pivotal part in protecting and improving the well-being of Georgia's indigenous trees.

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5. Montana: Swan River State Forest Active in Timber Harvest, Forest Management

FlatheadNewsGroup.com (October 15) - Jason Parke is a project leader for the Swan River State Forest, an outpost in the Swan Valley that manages 56,300 acres of timber land with one overarching purpose: create revenue for Montana schools by harvesting timber.

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6. Wisconsin: County OKs Storm Timber Sale

HaywardWI.com (October 20) - The Sawyer County Land, Water, and Forest Resources Committee approved high bids totaling $505,421 from loggers to cut and remove timber that was blown down in last month's storms on the county forest.

County Forest Administrator Greg Peterson said 10 tracts totaling 750 acres were offered in this salvage sale in the towns of Hayward, Lenroot, and Round Lake. Seven of the tracts totaling 506 acres were sold, encompassing 7,557 cords of pulpwood and 125,000 board feet of saw logs.

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7. Arizona: Senators Say Slow Thinning Is Damaging Forest Industrys

AZcentral.com (October 17) - Bureaucratic delays and a slow start to the nation's largest forest-thinning project could drive the forestry industry out of Arizona when the state really needs it, said US Sens. John McCain and Jeff Flake.

Overgrowth makes the forests more susceptible to devastating wildfires of the sort the state has seen in recent years. To address the problem, timber interests and environmental groups came together two years ago with the US Forest Service on an initiative to thin Arizona's Kaibab, Coconino, Apache-Sitgreaves, and Tonto National Forests.

The initiative to thin those forests depends on private industry to use the profit from wood products to cover the cost of tree cutting and removal.

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II. Federal Lands Management

1. USFS Northern Region Reaches Timber Harvest Goal

MTPR.org (October 16) - The US Forest Service's Northern Region met its timber harvest goal last year. That's the first time that has happened in over 14 years.

Regional Forester Faye Krueger says Region One, which includes Montana, harvested about 280 million board feet of timber.

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2. Federal Land Managers Draft Plan Confronting Climate Change

Billings Gazette.com (October 22) - Climate change trends in the Pacific Northwest already point to where snowpack levels, fish survival, and wildfire frequency are headed.

But how snow, fish, and wildfire might combine to affect lakeside picnicking is a work in progress. That's why roughly 100 federal, state, tribal, and private land managers packed into Missoula's Holiday Inn Parkside this week to write a climate-change vulnerability and adaptation plan.

The goal, agency representatives say, is to get everyone looking at everyone else's research and draw connections.

More:

Federal Land Managers to Collaborate on Wilderness Preservation System
National Parks Traveler.com (October 21)

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3. Roads Removed to Restore Forest Health

Great Falls Tribune.com (October 21) - Hard-packed roads that were identified for removal in 2007 are now being churned up and restored to a natural state across the Lewis and Clark National Forest, with the aim being improved vegetation growth and water flow.

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4. Managing Balance in the Forest

Aspen Daily News.com (October 19) - The Aspen-Sopris Ranger District is one of the most beloved districts in the White River National Forest, which hosts more visitors annually than any other within the national forest system. Unfortunately, in the view of new Aspen-Sopris District Ranger Karen Schroyer, the most beloved parts of the district, such as the Maroon Bells, Four-Pass Loop, and Conundrum Hot Springs, are being loved to death.

Yet, taking a long-range view, Schroyer says that, through better management practices, these areas can be loved back to life.

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III. Internatinal Forestry

1. Unlikely Partner Could Boost "Best Deal" for Protecting Forests, Slowing Climate Change

CIFOR.org (October 22) - A declaration by the governors of 21 tropical states and provinces announced recently at the United Nations Climate Summit is one of the "best deals going" for mitigating climate change and protecting tropical forests, a top scientist says.

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2. China Tests Outright Logging Ban in State Forests

The Guardian.com (October 17) - China has halted commercial logging by state firms in forests in Heilongjiang, a move experts see as a significant step to curb over-exploitation of timber.

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IV. Forest Products Industry

1. Presidential Proclamation: National Forest Products Week

Whitehouse.gov (October 17) - "Our nation's forests are an essential element of our urban spaces and rural landscape. Covering more than 750 million acres across America, they create opportunities for recreation and habitats for wildlife, and their products play an integral role in our nation's economy and our daily lives. Paper and wood products allow us to communicate, teach, and learn. They provide us shelter and energy, and they package and deliver our food, medicine, and manufactured goods. And whether it is a paper containing the Gettysburg Address or a child's crayon masterpiece, these products capture life's memorable moments across generations. During National Forest Products Week, we celebrate the many uses of our natural bounty, and we renew our commitment to protect our forests and ensure these resources endure."

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2. US Tall Wood Building Competition Announced

Whitehouse.gov (October 10) - As part of the Obama administration's commitment to mitigate climate change, the US Department of Agriculture, in partnership with the Softwood Lumber Board and the Bi-national Softwood Lumber Council, is announcing the US Tall Wood Building Prize Competition.

This competitive prize, open to teams of architects, engineers, and developers, will showcase the architectural and commercial viability of advanced wood products like cross-laminated timber (CLT) in tall buildings.

The winner of the Tall Wood Building competition will receive support for incremental costs of pioneering wood construction techniques to address the engineering design and code variances needed to incorporate wood technologies into new building sites.

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3. Local Firms Would Sell Wood-If They Had It

Lowell Sun.com (October 20) - In the coming cold winter months, many Massachusetts residents are looking forward to warm, crackling fires in their homes. But according to firewood distributors in the area, there may not be enough wood to go around.

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4. Bat Proposal Worries Black Hills Timber Industry

Argus Leader.com (October 20) - The Black Hills timber industry could suffer irreparable damage if the northern long-eared bat is added to the list of endangered species, according to the Black Hills Forest Resource Association (BHFRA).

The US Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to add the bat to the endangered species list because of a fungus called white-nose syndrome that is killing bats in the eastern United States.

According to the BHFRA, a listing would restrict forest management, including timber harvest and mountain pine beetle management.

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5. Sierra Pacific Seeks to Undo $47 Million Settlementry

Redding.com (October 10) - Sierra Pacific Industries, accused of starting a 102-square-mile wildfire, is seeking to undo a $47 million legal settlement because of alleged misdeeds by investigators and prosecutors.

The Anderson-based company filed hundreds of pages of court documents in federal court seeking to re-open a case settled in 2012. The settlement also included Sierra Pacific transferring 22,500 acres of land to the state of California.

State and federal prosecutors and investigators concluded that the state's largest timber company was responsible for a 2007 wildfire that consumed 40,000 acres of national forest in northern California, as well as another 25,000 acres.

A state court judge in February found that California officials lied and hid evidence, and the judge ordered the state to pay the company $30 million. The company is citing the same evidence to re-open the federal case.

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6. Canada Files WTO Complaint about Chinese Wood Pulp Duties

CBC.CA (October 16) - Canada has made a formal complaint to the World Trade Organization over China imposing what Ottawa says are unfair duties on Canadian companies that ship a certain type of wood pulp there.

Canada made a formal complaint to the global trade watchdog today, claiming that in November 2013 and April 2014, China imposed dumping duties between 13 and 23 percent on Canadian lumber companies, including Fortress Paper and Tembec.

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V. Biomass

1. Biomass Proving a Cost-Effective Energy Solution

Chillicothe Gazette.com (October 20) - Woody biomass is quietly expanding as a viable, cost-effective energy alternative to fossil fuels in America.

Energy-efficient commercial and industrial woody biomass boiler systems of various types and sizes are gradually building an excellent track record in schools, hospitals, and municipal complexes across the Northeast, mid-Atlantic, and Midwest states, including at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Chillicothe.

This past August, The Gazette took a look back at three recently installed biomass energy demonstration projects at facilities in Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Massachusetts to see whether the longer-term results lived up to their expectations.

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2. Op-Ed: Studies Steadily Advance Cellulosic Ethanol Prospects

Ethanol Producer.com (October 16) - The potential for producing cost-effective cellulosic ethanol that uses plentiful and sustainable cellulosic plant biomass continues to grow, thanks to research at the US Department of Agriculture. USDA Agricultural Research Service scientists at the Bioenergy Research Unit in Peoria, Illinois, have recently completed studies on multiple approaches that could help streamline cellulosic ethanol production.

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3. Vega Biofuels Breaks Ground on Pilot Torrefaction Plant

Biomass Magazine.com (October 15) - Vega Biofuels recently announced it has entered into the joint venture to build and operate a pilot manufacturing plant in Allendale, South Carolina, to produce bio-coal, among other torrefied products. When completed in the first quarter of 2015, the plant will use a patented torrefaction technology to produce the company's green-energy bio-coal product from plant and wood biomass, which will then be sold to power companies around the world.

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4. CHP Plant Set for Florida Resort

COSPP.com (October 17) - Chesapeake Utilities Corporation subsidiary, Eight Flags Energy, LLC, is pursuing the development and construction of a combined heat and power plant in Fernandina Beach on Amelia Island in Nassau County, Florida.

The plant will be built on a site to be leased from Rayonier Performance Fibers, a subsidiary of Rayonier Advanced Materials. The site is adjacent to a cellulose specialties plant that Rayonier Performance Fibers operates.

The CHP plant will generate steam that will be sold to Rayonier Performance Fibers, pursuant to an agreement executed by Eight Flags and Rayonier Performance Fibers, for use in the operation of the Performance Fibers' plant. The plant also will produce approximately 20 MW of base load power that will be sold to Chesapeake's wholly-owned subsidiary, Florida Public Utilities Company (FPU), for distribution to its retail electric customers.

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5. Bioenergy Day Highlights Benefits of Heating with Wood

ESF.edu (October 22) - The SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry joined the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority and the New York Biomass Energy Alliance October 22 in celebrating National Bioenergy Day with activities to educate the public about cleaner, more efficient ways to heat with wood and the value of sustainable forestry.

The celebration featured information about Governor Andrew M. Cuomo's Renewable Heat NY initiative, a tour of the college's combined heat-and-power (CHP) system at the Gateway Center, remarks about the bioenergy industry in New York State and a tour of a pellet boiler demonstration system.

National Bioenergy Day celebrates the role that this sustainable, renewable, carbon-friendly resource plays in producing electricity and heat generated from wood and other organic materials.

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VI. Wildfire

1. Mobile Burn Unit Demonstrated in Ruidoso

Ruidosonews.com (October 21) - Designed primarily as a pollution control device because of its ability to contain smoke emissions, a BurnBoss mobile air curtain incinerator or related unit might solve some problems connected to the mammoth job of disposing of forest slash facing officials in Lincoln County and Ruidoso, New Mexico.

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2. When Firefighters Encounter Marijuana Growers

Lostcoastoutpost.com (October 20) - "Thank you, firefighters," proclaimed signs that sprouted up in northern Mendocino County near the Lodge Lightning Complex soon after several blazes started in late July.

However, there are some individuals who perceive firefighters as a possible threat. Marijuana growers fear they'll lose their crop or even be jailed when fire personnel encounter their rural gardens.

And, at the same time, firefighters fear that growers will get violent or that possibly booby traps set (very rarely) to protect a grow might injure crewmembers who encounter them.

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3. The Innovative, Unlikely Idea That Could Save America's Forests

Takepart.com (October 17) - This article details how one-person's trip to Quito, Ecuador, in 2006 led to the launch of the Santa Fe Water Fund-a plan to charge city residents a monthly fee (about $0.65 per household, on average) to raise $4.3 million over 20 years for thinning 17,000 acres in the Santa Fe National Forest. The plan is intended to reduce the likelihood of severe fires, which will keep healthy trees in the ground, foster groundwater recharge, and keep soil in its place and out of the river.

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4. Wildfire Fuel Reduction Efforts Continue in Carolina Forest

WBTW.com (October 16) - According to recent statistics from the South Carolina Forestry Commission, more than 3,000 wildfires and brush fires burn across South Carolina each year.

Now, more efforts are moving forward to reduce wildfire fuel in the Carolina Forest-area of Horry County. The growing community is a hotspot for wildfires because of its geographical layout and the vegetation growing in the area.

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VII. Forest Pests

1. The Invasive Emerald Ash Borer Has Killed Millions of Trees, but Researchers Hope a Wasp Can Save Some of the Survivors

PRI.org (October 21) - The emerald ash borer has killed millions of ash trees in North America over the past decade. Now, researchers in New Hampshire are releasing a small parasitic wasp in a last ditch effort to save some of those that are left.

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2. Chopping Down Trees Only Solution to Emerald Ash Borer

Niagara This Week.com (October 22) - Residents had best get used to the sounds of chainsaws for the foreseeable future, with city politicians hearing there is no alternative to cutting down trees to deal with the devastation of the emerald ash borer.

By some accounts, upwards of a third of Niagara's vast tree canopy could eventually be wiped out by the bug.

City politicians agreed in August to a cost overrun of up to $108,000 to cut down about 240 damaged ash trees posing the most immediate threat of branches ready to fall. They also agreed in September to fund up to $48,000 to plant new trees next to where ash trees have to come down.

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3. Emerald Ash Borer May Have Spread to Different Tree

Columbus Dispatch.com (October 15) - The emerald ash borer, a voracious beetle that has destroyed ash trees throughout Ohio might also be killing off another type of tree, according to research by a university biologist.

Wright State University professor Don Cipollini discovered that the emerald ash borer also is using the white fringetree as a host, eating its leaves and infesting its trunk to reproduce.

The tree is considered a decorative ornamental. It's sold at nurseries and also shows up in the wild along the Ohio River.

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VIII. Urban Forestry

1. Madison City Council Approves New Urban Forestry Fee

Madison.com (October 22) - Madison residents will likely see another charge next year, designed specifically to fund the city's urban forestry program and assist in treating emerald ash borer infestation.

The City Council voted to create the special charge after voting it down 11-8 two weeks before. The details are yet to be determined, but some options include assessing it based on a parcel's linear frontage, by resident, or by utility bill.

Though the charge would technically fund the forestry program as a whole, most of the council's discussion centered on emerald ash borer mitigation, a large reason for creating the fee. Many alders had changed their minds after hearing from constituents concerned about the loss of trees.

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2. Ash Tree Removals in Madison Parks Spark Neighborhood Action

Madison.com (October 23) - As the emerald ash borer continues to spread across Madison, neighborhoods are becoming concerned about losing their parks' ash trees.

The city is focusing its funds for treatment of street ash trees, leaving the park trees to be cut down unless adopted and their treatment paid for by residents. So far, only a couple dozen trees have been adopted.

For 2015, the department is planning to remove 1,700 trees preemptively and treat 6,000 citywide. The department does not yet have a count of the total number of park trees. Eventually, all park ash trees not adopted will be removed, city officials said.

This impending loss of park ash trees has spurred the Eastmorland Community Association to start the green ribbon project, raising awareness and funds to help keep some of the trees.

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3. Students Tag Trees for Annual Appreciation Week

MontanaLaimin.com (October 21) - Amid traditional orange and red leaves signaling fall, students may notice an uncharacteristic green and yellow clinging to trees this week.

The tags display the financial and environmental benefits each tree brings to the campus as part of National Forest Products Week. The week of appreciation was established in 1960, by a joint resolution of Congress recognizing the importance of US forests.

The project was spearheaded by University of Montana student Josh Smith, chair of the student chapter of the Society of American Foresters.

Using a tool called a "tree benefit calculator," Smith, along with members of the Urban Forestry Department, used algorithms based on tree species and climate range to determine values such as carbon storage, air quality and energy savings. Once the value of each tree is calculated, the price displayed is how much it's worth.

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IX. Water Resources

1. Cable Logging Concerns Dominate Flagstaff Watershed Protection Comments

AZ Daily Sun.com (October 21) - Since Flagstaff voters approved the $10 million Flagstaff Watershed Protection Project in 2012, the project has become a closely watched and carefully scrutinized example of what a community-funded forest treatment plan should look like.

The environmental impacts of cable logging, effects on recreation, and concern over how the Forest Service will oversee the project have emerged as major themes among the hundreds of comments that were submitted. Though the Forest Service has already analyzed and answered them, it will wait to release its official responses until the completion of the final environmental impact statement and draft decision on the project next summer.

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2. Trees vs. Humans: In California Drought, Nature Gets to Water First

CNBC.com (October 17) - It seems like a "sin of nature" that trees may be adding to the misery of California's extreme drought. But that may be the case, according to researchers from the University of California.

The problem is with forests that have grown denser with trees and brush over time in California's Sierra Nevada Mountains. The trees are soaking up a lot more water that would normally be filling up many of the state's reservoirs, which are at very low levels because of three years of severe drought.

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3. Forestry Summit: "Rival" Agencies Come Together for Salmon, Watert

Willits News.com (October 17) - Serious efforts by the state to improve water quality and restore salmon led to a "historic" meeting at Fort Bragg Town Hall last month between two former "rival" state agencies-the California Board of Forestry and Fire Protection and the North Coast Regional Water Board.

There was much optimism that more can be done to improve serious erosion problems in the grand forests and, as a result, bring back the Coho salmon.

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X. Science & Research

1. Virginia Institute of Marine Science Researches Restoring Forested Wetlands

Dailypress.com (October 21) - A trio of citizen scientists armed with measuring tools moved from one tree to the next to the next-from black willow to sycamore to white oak.

It's a process volunteers will repeat more than 1,200 times this week and next, taking about 30,000 numbers in all, as part of a seven-year field experiment intended to help restore vulnerable forested wetlands.

There are various types of wetlands, but forested headwater wetlands and their associated small streams represent a larger percentage of Virginia's waterways. They're also the wetlands most likely to be impacted by human activity-they're drier, don't lie in deep water, and are sited where streams are small so they're easier to log or convert to agriculture.

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2. Satellites for Smart Logging

Phys.org (October 22) - Treemetrics in Ireland, supported by ESA's ARTES Program, has developed an all-encompassing device with hybrid satellite/terrestrial communications and GPS to better manage the use of forest resources.

Satellites are mapping forests, sending instructions to loggers, monitoring tree-harvesting machinery and coordinating log transport almost in real time.

The display gives detailed mapping information, showing a harvesting machine's driver which trees should be felled and how the wood should be cut.

At the same time, information on the logger's progress and location is sent via satellite to a central web-based system.

The in-vehicle display also helps other drivers find the logs stacked at specified locations so they can be moved to the roadside to await transport to sawmills.

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3. Climate Change Not Responsible for Altering Forest Tree Compositiong

News.psu.edu (October 15) - Change in disturbance regimes, rather than a change in climate, is largely responsible for altering the composition of eastern forests, according to a researcher in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences.

Forests in the eastern United States remain in a state of "disequilibrium" stemming from the clearcutting and large-scale burning that occurred in the late 1800s and early 1900s, contends Marc Abrams, professor of forest ecology and physiology.

Moreover, Abrams noted, since about 1930-during the Smokey Bear era-aggressive forest-fire suppression has had a far greater influence on shifts in dominant tree species than minor differences in temperature.

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4. If You Plant Different Trees in the Forest, Is It Still the Same Forest?

Guardian.com (October 19) - The North Woods has joined the ever-lengthening list of regions threatened by climate change.

These increases are expected to continue through the next 50 years, as a result of more days of extreme heat, heavier precipitation, and other changes to the region's climate. As rainfall and other conditions shift because of climate change, once iconic species like spruce and fir may move northward, either leaving the forests replaced by unproductive grasslands or given over to the hardwoods more common further south.

In the hope that it may be able to save the North Woods, the Nature Conservancy's North Dakota, South Dakota, and Minnesota chapter has begun experimenting with a controversial technique- assisted migration-that, if proven to be successful, could lead to trees being moved from distant reaches of the state's forests to those most threatened by climate change.

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5. Microclimates May Buffer Some Streams from Global Warming

Summit County Voice.com (October 19) - Global warming is all but sure to raise stream temperatures in many areas, but it turns out that changes in air temperatures don't offer a reliable proxy for projecting those changes.

Especially in the mountains streams of the West, topography and riparian conditions are huge factors in regulating stream temperatures.

The correlation between air temperature and stream temperature is surprisingly tenuous, according to stream ecologists at Oregon State University, who examined historic stream temperature data over a period of one to four decades from 25 sites in the western United States.

The findings cast doubt on many statistical models using air temperatures to predict future stream temperatures.

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6. Scientists Study Fire's Effects on Rare Snake

KRQE.com (October 19) - Following a fire that ripped through northern Arizona's Oak Creek Canyon last summer, scientists are only now beginning to study the effects on sensitive plants and species.

The narrow-headed garter snake is among the species they're monitoring. The reptile, which is found in clear, rocky streams in Arizona and New Mexico, was designated as a threatened species in July.

Before the Slide Fire, Oak Creek Canyon had the largest and most dense population of narrow-headed garter snakes. The Arizona Daily Sun reports that scientists aren't sure about that now.

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7. Scientists Seek Survivor Ash Trees

Toledo Blade.com (October 20) - Federal scientists believe there are a few extra hardy ash trees out in nature that have-for reasons unknown-defied the odds and held up against the highly destructive emerald ash borer.

Now, they want the public's help in finding those "survivor" trees-and are starting their research in seven northwest Ohio counties and 10 southeast Michigan counties.

Ash trees used for landscaping in subdivisions or office complexes, for example, may have been treated with insecticides. Those aren't the trees scientists are seeking. Rather, they're looking for those rarities out in the wild, such as any surviving ash trees that hikers and birders might pass along trails in the woods.

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XI. Items of Interest

1. Hal Salwasser, Former Dean of OSU's Forestry College Dies at 69

Gazettetimes.com (October 16) - Harold J. "Hal" Salwasser, former dean of the College of Forestry at Oregon State University, died October 15. He was 69 years old.

Salwasser had been an active member of the forestry faculty since stepping down as dean in 2012 after 12 years leading the college. He had planned to retire from Oregon State at the end of December.

As dean, Salwasser oversaw a forestry program that is more than 120 years old. Today, the OSU College of Forestry has an annual budget of some $25 million, with more than 1,000 undergraduate and graduate students.

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2. For Virginia Tech Expert, There's a Science to Fall Foliage

Newsadvance.com (October 19) - Virginia Tech tree scientist John Seiler has a passion for trees. He's been studying them for his entire career and he is one of the creators of the leading tree identification smartphone app.

With about 150,000 downloads since 2011, VTree is used all over the country by amateur hikers, tree experts, and outdoor enthusiasts. It uses a phone's GPS to determine what trees could possibly exist where you're standing, then asks a series of questions to narrow down the list. Eventually, it will identify exactly which tree species you're looking at.

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3. Popular Wilderness Area Requires Intensive Management to Remain Natural

VTNews.vt.edu (October 17) - In 1982, Jeff Marion, now an adjunct professor in the College of Natural Resources and Environment and a recreation ecologist with the US Geological Survey, surveyed 96 of the 2,200 campsites in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness for his doctoral research.

With funding from his agency and the US Forest Service, which manages the wilderness area, he returned in July 2014 to document the impact of continued use on those sites and to measure recovery on 10 sites that had been closed.

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4. Op-Eds by SAF Members

Beetle Areas Prioritized, by Frank Carroll
Rapid City Journal.com (October 21)

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XII. SAF News

1. 2014 SAF Elections Ballot

As you know, the 2014 SAF national and unit elections and referendum votes will be held in October. All SAF members will receive a ballot and are encouraged to vote. Please be aware, though, that there is an important change to the ballot.

After receiving comments from members about consequences of consolidating SAF's membership categories, the Council decided to withdraw those questions from the ballot. A letter from President Dave Walters explaining this decision can be found on the SAF website.

Council representatives are committed to talking with as many SAF members as possible about the rationale for consolidating the membership categories. If you are already engaged with the Council, thank you. If not, please speak your mind. The Council wants to hear your thoughts on how to increase SAF's relevance to every natural-resources professional who works in or is closely associated with forestry.

Please don't hesitate to contribute your insights, experience, and wisdom on this issue. Here's how you can do so:

  • Share your thoughts with us at membershipdialog@safnet.org
  • Talk to your Council member or your state society, division, or chapter leadership
  • Join SAF discussions on LinkedIn
  • Submit a letter to the editor of The Forestry Source (send letters to editor Steve Wilent at wilents@safnet.org).

If you have any questions on the votes, please feel free to contact SAF chief executive officer Matt Menashes.

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2. Be Sure You Receive Your 2014 Election Ballot

This year SAF is using a new vendor for the national and local unit elections. To ensure your ballot is received and accepted by your e-mail server, be sure to save the following e-mail address to your contacts before October 1: saf@intelliscaninc.net.

Members that do not have an e-mail address listed with SAF will still receive a paper ballot.

Matt Menashes at (866) 897-8720, ext. 120.

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3. SAF Launches New Membership Portal

In response to members' concerns about the functionality of the SAF website, the Society has launched a beta version of its new Membership Portal. Naturally, we want to know what you think about it, so check it out at live.safnet.org and send us your comments.

The portal is designed to offer easier access to SAF member services, expedite the renewal process, provide up-to-date information about members' involvement with SAF (e.g., CFE credits, subscriptions, and so on), give the latest forestry news, facilitate giving, and more!

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4. Renew Your SAF Membership for 2015

Be sure to renew your SAF membership for 2015 or risk being cut off from the SAF products and services you enjoy, such as reading the latest forestry-related news with The Forestry Source, learning about the latest in forest research in the Journal of Forestry,* find your competitive edge with the nation's largest listing of continuing forestry education.

But wait, there's more! Your membership in SAF also gives you access to: the SAF Career Center, the SAF Store, discounted rates on Consulting and Prescribed Fire Insurance, discounted rates on automotive insurance, Certified Forester discounts, discounted life and disability insurance, and discounts and rewards with 1,000+ retailers!

Become a platinum member and receive even more benefits, including three free Continuing Education Quizzes from the Journal of Forestry (a $90 value).

Need Help?

  • If you need assistance, call (866) 897-8720 x100 or e-mail membership@safnet.org
  • Monthly Payments: Split your total membership dues into equal monthly payments for the rest of the year. Select "monthly" on your online checkout or call us.

Submit payment by check, just print the e-mail confirmation after joining online and send your payment to SAF at 5400 Grosvenor Lane, Bethesda, MD 20814-2198. Or, fax your payment, print the e-mail confirmation and fax your payment to (301) 897-3690. You can also make your payment over the phone by calling (866) 897-8720 x100.

Note: All memberships are calendar year. *Not eligible with Silver Membership Service Level.

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About The E-Forester:

A Benefit of SAF Membership:
The E-Forester is sent to SAF members in good standing each week.

Disclaimer:
The Society of American Foresters does not necessarily endorse the views expressed in the news items and/or links to additional information that appear in The E-Forester.

Meeting Announcements:
The E-Forester will no longer include announcements for forestry events, gatherings, or tours not (co)sponsored by SAF.

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