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April 25, 2014

IUFRO Early Rates End Wednesday, April 30!
The Early Bird registration deadline for the XXIV International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO) World Congress is April 30 2014 at 11:59pm Central US Time. All IUFRO presenters must register and pay by this deadline to remain on the Congress' scientific program. Delegates can select from an exciting menu of In-Congress tours during their registration. NOTE: You do not need to register separately for SAF/CIF if you register for IUFRO.

REGISTER NOW



E-Forester Archives? More than a few folks have asked if The E-Forester is archived on the SAF website. It is not, primarily because links to news articles change quickly. However, if you're looking for something from a past issue, contact me and I'll do my best to get you what you need.

I. Featured News

1. Rim Fire Losses Must Be Salvaged Quickly, Coalition Warns
2. Kensico Reservoir: Sandy-Damaged Trees Almost Gone
3. Invasive News: Adelgids, Beetles, and Borers
4. Wildfire: Fire Trends Ohio, Reflections on Fire in South Carolina, and Reducing Fire Risk in Oregon
5. Lawsuit Challenges Timber Sales

Forest Products Industry

6. Sawmill Making the Cut
7. Illinois' Spreading Forests Build State's Economy
8. Biomass News

Federal Lands Management

9. US Forest Service Seeks Applications for Wood-to-Energy Projects
10. Montana Uses $345,000 Grant to Buy Grizzly Habitat
11. Alaska Legislature Backs Tongass Takeover Plan
12. Watchdog Criticizes Bullock's 5 Million Acre Forest Restoration Request
13. Are Ohio Laws against Timber Theft Too Weak?

II. Publications, Resources, and Items of Interest

1. Minnesota Launches Deer vs. Trees Debate
2. Maryland, Missouri Tree Farmers Recognized
3. The Past, Present, and Future of Saratoga Springs' Trees

III. Science and Technology

1. US Forest Service Pacific Northwest Region Releases Interactive Restoration Story Map Atlas
2. Five Anthropogenic Factors That Will Radically Alter Forest Conditions and Management Needs in the Northern United States
3. Ecology Team Improves Understanding of Valley-Wide Stream Chemistry

IV. SAF News

1. SAF Accepting Nominations for Vice-President and Council
2. Need Money for School? Apply for a Ben Meadows Natural Resources Scholarship
3. 2014 SAF Convention News-Info on Everything from Airfare to Presentations
4. SAF Members: Give Us Your Comments on the Internal Communications Survey
5. SAF Meetings


I. Featured News

All of these items and more appear in the "Featured News" section on the SAF home page

1. Rim Fire Losses Must Be Salvaged Quickly, Coalition Warns

Record.Net (April 23) - Salvage logging is a good thing and needs to be done quickly in the 257,000-acre area charred by last summer's Rim Fire, says a coalition that includes environmentalists, mining and timber interests, and representatives of recreation groups such as the American Motorcyclist Association.

In a letter sent to Randy Moore, the regional forester for the US Forest Service, the Yosemite Stanislaus Solutions coalition called for "prompt" action on salvage logging plans and warned that delays could "jeopardize the multiple economic and environmental benefits" of the proposed post-fire logging and restoration projects.

Yosemite Stanislaus Solutions formed in 2010 to seek better cooperation among various public and private groups with a stake in the management of forests in Stanislaus National Forest and Yosemite National Park.

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2. Kensico Reservoir: Sandy-Damaged Trees Almost Gone

Lohud.com (April 23) - If a tree falls in the forest, it makes a sound sometimes loud enough to drown out a chainsaw and the tractor-like "grappler" machine that helps push it over.

In this case, the trees are mainly Norway spruce around the Kensico Reservoir in North Castle and Mount Pleasant. The New York City Department of Environmental Protection, which oversees the reservoir, began cleaning up "Superstorm" Sandy blow-downs and other damaged trees in early 2013. The project, which should be finished by Memorial Day, is an effort to protect water quality, improve the diversity of watershed land by replanting different species, and being a good neighbor.

Note: For more on the effects of Superstorm Sandy, see "Superstorm Sandy Hits East Coast, Destroying Homes and Damaging Forests" from the December 2012 issue of The Forestry Source.

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3. Invasive News: Adelgids, Beetles, and Borers

Tiny Bug Sucking Life Out of Prime Kentucky Hemlock Trees

Kentucky Forward.com (April 23) - Tens of millions of Kentucky hemlock trees are at risk from a bug just one-sixteenth of an inch in size that literally sucks the life out of them.

The hemlock woolly adelgid, which has no natural predators, has infested trees in nearly a quarter of the state's 120 counties, mostly in southeastern Kentucky, but also as far west as Lexington.

State Commission to Help Residents Fight Tree-Killing Pests

Anniston Star.com (April 21) - The Alabama Forestry Commission announced this month that it is awarding $160,000 to landowners to use prescribed burns and thinning on their pine stands to stop the spread of the Southern pine beetle. Landowners with 10 to 100 acres of pine trees are eligible to apply for the grant money.

CUNY Television Program Airs Segment on Pine Beetles in New Jersey

CUNY.TV (April 22) - The latest installment of Science & U!, a program on New York independent television station CUNY TV, examines the work being done to keep pine beetles in check in the New Jersey Pine Barrens.

To view the pine beetle segment, visit YouTube.com.

Ash Borer Found in Winona

Winona Post.com (April 23) - The emerald ash borer is officially in the city of Winona, Minnesota. After the Asian bug was found in the Twin Cities in 2009, Winona County was one of the first parts of Minnesota to be affected by the pest. Infestations were found in the La Crescent area in 2011, and the city of Winona started preparing for the inevitable the following year.

With roughly 2,800 ash trees on boulevards and in city parks, the species is the second most common tree in Winona. Ash trees make up 26 percent of the city's boulevard trees and only maples provide more shade along city streets.

Vermont Hopes to Raise Awareness of Threat to Ash Tree

Times Argus.com (April 23) - There are an estimated 160 million ash trees in Vermont, about 10 percent of all the trees in the state, second only to the sugar maple.

Faced with a cutback in federal funding for detection of the invasive emerald ash borer, state and federal forestry officials hope a week of events devoted to the ash will help raise awareness of the tree and the threat to its future.

Destructive Beetle Found in Berks County

Republican Herald.com (April 21) - The emerald ash borer, a small, highly destructive wood-boring beetle that's been devastating ash trees throughout the northeastern United States, was recently found in Berks County, Pennsylvania.

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4. Wildfire: Fire Trends Ohio, Reflections on Fire in South Carolina, and Reducing Fire Risk in Oregon

Ohio: Forest Fires Not Trending Upward

Chillicothe Gazette.com (April 22) - The Scioto Valley has seen three forest fires this month alone, but there's nothing in the statewide figures so far in 2014 to suggest it's a particularly bad year for such incidents.

This year, the Ohio Department of Natural Resources' Division of Forestry has received reports of 310 forest fires that have burned about 1,500 acres. In a normal year, Ohio sees between 500 and 600 fires and the burning of 2,000 to 3,000 acres.

South Carolina: Agencies, Residents Reflect on Highway 31 Fire

The State.com (April 22) - Charred trees now tower over bright green vegetation between Carolina Forest and North Myrtle Beach along South Carolina 31, where the state's most destructive wildfire burned five years ago.

Since then, the South Carolina Forestry Commission and Horry County Fire Rescue officials say residents and firefighters have learned lessons, and improvements have been made, particularly in firefighting equipment.

Oregon: Reducing Risks of Wildfires

Statesman Journal.com (April 22) - The 2013 fire season is one the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) and firefighters won't soon forget. Consequently, heading into the warmer days of 2014, ODF officials and others are making it a point to underscore any project they can to promote fire prevention.

Forest Officer Jerrin Robbins with the Oregon Department of Forestry, North Cascade District, is collaborating with Santiam Canyon landowners and other ODF officials in offering matching-grant money to help landowners reduce risks and hazards associated with wildfires.

And in other fire news…

More, Bigger Wildfires Burning Western United States

Utah State University/American Geophysical Union (April 17) - Wildfires across the western United States have been getting bigger and more frequent over the last 30 years - a trend that could continue as climate change causes temperatures to rise and drought to become more severe in the coming decades, according to new research from Utah State University.

More:

Wildfires Really Are on the Rise in West, Utah Researchers Say
Salt Lake Tribune.com (April 23)

Trend of Wildfire Growth in Western US Identified by New Research
Daily Californian.org (April 23)

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5. Lawsuit Challenges Timber Sales

Statesman Journal.com (April 22) - Cascadia Wildlands, the Audubon Society of Portland, and the Center for Biological Diversity have filed a lawsuit challenging Oregon's decision to sell part of the Elliott State Forest northeast of Coos Bay.

In December, the State Land Board approved the sale of five scattered tracts in the forest through an open competitive bid process, with a total of 2,700 acres.

The legal complaint alleges the parcel is prohibited from being sold by law.

More:

Two Timber Companies Win Bids to Buy Elliott State Forest Parcels
Oregon Live.com (April 21)

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Forest Products Industry

6. Sawmill Making the Cut

Keep ME Current.com (April 17) - Saws are humming again at Pleasant River Pine on New Dam Road in Sanford, the site of the former Lavalley Lumber and sawmill.

The original mill, built by the Lavalley family in 1944, was sold to United Ventures, a holding company, which filed for bankruptcy in February 2012. Ten months later, Chris and Jason Brochu, copresidents of Pleasant River Companies of Dover-Foxcroft, stepped up to purchase the Sanford sawmill facility along with 40 acres of land. The mill was re-named Pleasant River Pine and now produces eastern white pine products exclusively.

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7. Illinois' Spreading Forests Build State's Economy

Insurance News Net.com (April 20) - Forestland in Illinois is expanding at a brisk pace — about 60 percent more acres of timber exist today than in the 1920s —and experts say state forestry products are a $23 billion industry that accounts for more than 131,000 jobs.

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8. Biomass News

US Wood Pellet Exports to Europe Hit Record High

Click Green.org.uk (April 23) - Europe's boom in biomass demand has led to a doubling of wood pellet exports from North America in just two years to reach 4.7 million tons in 2013, according to the latest data.

North America exported wood pellets valued at over 650 million dollars in 2013, a dramatic increase of more than 250 percent in just two years, according to new research released by the North American Wood Fiber Review.

Phoenix Energy to Build Biomass Gasification Plant in California

Bioenergy-News.com (April 22) - Independent power producer Phoenix Energy is to build and operate a 2 mega-watt biomass gasification plant near Lake Tahoe, California, after signing agreements.

The company, which develops onsite biomass gasification plants, says the facility will produce electricity, heat, and biochar from forest residues sourced from Placer County's fire threat reduction activities.

Placer County is looking for an alternative to open burning of large biomass piles in a bid to reduce the risk of forest fires and improve air quality.

New—and More Economical—Pyrolysis Techniques for Bio-oil Production

USDA.gov (April 2014) - Fast pyrolysis, the process of rapidly heating biomass without oxygen, produces energy-dense bio-oil from wood, plants, and other carbon-based materials.

"It's becoming one of the most promising methods for extracting the energy from tough plant materials to produce liquid fuels," says Agricultural Research Service (ARS) chemist Charles Mullen. Now, innovations by Mullen and his ARS colleagues are bringing researchers one step closer to using pyrolysis in production systems that farmers can use to meet their on-farm energy needs-or to produce renewable fuels for commercial markets.

Biofuel Industry Criticizes Study on Corn Stover and Soil Carbon

Biomass Magazine.com (April 22) - The biofuel industry is speaking out against a study completed by University of Nebraska-Lincoln researchers that claims cellulosic biofuels actually generate more greenhouse gases than gasoline.

The study, "Biofuels from crop residue can reduce soil carbon and increase carbon dioxide emissions," was published in the academic journal Nature Climate Change on April 20. According to information published on the study, removal of corn residue for biofuels can decrease soil organic carbon and increase carbon dioxide emissions because residue carbon in biofuels is oxidized to carbon dioxide at a faster rate than when added to soil.

The Renewable Fuels Association has called the study deeply flawed and out of step with current science, noting the analysis shows a complete lack of understanding of current farming practices.

Group Launches New Hampshire Wood Energy Council

Biomass Magazine.com (April 18) - A group of public sector and private business have partnered up to launch the New Hampshire Wood Energy Council, a nonprofit partnership that the group said will promote heating commercial and institutional buildings in New Hampshire with wood.

The council, being partially funded with a $250,000, three-year US Forest Service grant, has a mission to provide advice, support, and direct assistance to municipal, school, and business building owners considering wood as an alternative to nonrenewable heating fuels, such as heating oil and propane.

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Federal Lands Management

9. US Forest Service Seeks Applications for Wood-to-Energy Projects

USDA.gov (April 22) - As part of the national observance of Earth Day, the US Forest Service announced that it is seeking proposals that expand wood energy use and support responsible forest management.

Published in the Federal Register, the US Forest Service announcement requests proposals under the Hazardous Fuels Wood-to-Energy Grant program. According to the agency, the initiative will provide about $2.8 million to help successful applicants complete the engineering design work needed to apply for public or private loans for construction and long-term financing of wood energy facilities.

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10. Montana Uses $345,000 Grant to Buy Grizzly Habitat

KXLO-KLCM.com (April 22) - The Montana Land Board on has approved a $345,000 purchase of 320 acres of threatened grizzly bear habitat to add to the Blackleaf Wildlife Management Area in Teton County.

The state is buying the land from the Conservation Fund with a grant from a US Fish and Wildlife Services program to help the recovery of grizzlies in the northern Continental Divide.

The 320 acres of timber, grasslands, and wetlands are considered critical grizzly bear habitat and is adjacent to the 10,397-acre wildlife management area. The Conservation Fund originally purchased the land to prevent it from being sold to landowners who may not have been interested in protecting the bear habitat, state officials said.

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11. Alaska Legislature Backs Tongass Takeover Plan

KTOO.org (April 21) - The Alaska State Legislature has voted to support state plans to take over acreage in the Tongass National Forest.

Proposed by Sitka Sen. Bert Stedman (R), the resolution urges Congress to act on Gov. Sean Parnell's request to take over federal acreage.

The resolution passed the Senate in March and the House on Friday, April 20.

Click here to see Sen. Stedman's statement in support of Parnell's request.

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12. Watchdog Criticizes Bullock's 5 Million Acre Forest Restoration Request

Missoulian.com (April 18) - The WildWest Institute, a Missoula forestry watchdog organization, has accused Gov. Steve Bullock of cutting the public out of the process when nominating roughly 5 million timbered acres for priority attention. Those involved in the governor's decision say the criticism is off base.

On April 7, Bullock announced his recommendations under the newly passed federal Farm Bill for acreage where he wants the US Forest Service to focus management action.

The institute said the governor issued no public notice and kept no records of the conference calls he had with seven people who had input on the choices.

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13. Are Ohio Laws against Timber Theft Too Weak?

Cleveland.com (April 20) - Ohio legislator Rep. Ross McGregor (R) is pushing legislation to boost prosecution of timber theft in a move that has the state forestry association worried about overregulation.

The bill would require a written agreement between landowners and the timber harvester that specifically shows which trees should be cut down. It also requires a written record of timber harvested from the landowner, helps identify errors made during the harvesting process, sets rules for property owner cost recovery, and creates a stronger method of valuing timber.

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II. Publications, Resources, and Items of Interest

1. Minnesota Launches Deer vs. Trees Debate

Star Tribune.com (April 21) - The likely increased numbers of Minnesota's favorite game animal will come at the peril of the state's beloved pine trees and the native plants, insects, and animals that live below them on the forest floor.

The state's deer population exploded starting in the late 1990s, and, due largely to recent harsh winters, has since declined somewhat. But study after study shows that browsing by overabundant deer herds is crushing the biodiversity of northern and eastern forests.

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2. Maryland, Missouri Tree Farmers Recognized

Maryland Names Tree Farmers of the Year

Cecil Daily.com (April 17) - Rick Abend and his wife, Kathy, have been recognized by the Maryland Forestry Service as Tree Farmers of the Year. The couple cites stress relief as among the uses for the family's tree farm. Other uses include wildlife habitat, bird-watching, agriculture, hunting, fishing, conservation education, and timber.

Missouri Tree Farmers Receive Statewide Recognition

Fulton Sun.com (April 20) - Bill and Margie Haag were awarded the Tree Farmer of the Year Award from the Missouri Department of Conservation at its annual Tree Farmers convention. A lifelong love for conservation motivated the Haags to take on the challenge of improving their land.

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3. The Past, Present, and Future of Saratoga Springs' Trees

Saratoga Wire.com (April 20) - Saratoga Springs, New York, is at the beginning of a period of urban reforestation. Even though the city's Broadway is currently lined with trees, many places within the city's urban core remain barren. The Department of Public Works, in partnership with Sustainable Saratoga's Urban Forestry project, have partnered to replant those mostly treeless streets, making large openings in sidewalks for native trees.

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III. Science and Technology

1. US Forest Service Pacific Northwest Region Releases Interactive Restoration Story Map Atlas

US Forest Service (undated) - The US Forest Service Pacific North West Region (Region 6) just released their interactive Restoration Story Map Atlas, which highlights the following:

  • Active Forest Restoration Need by Watershed on Forest Service Lands
  • Insect and Disease Risk Map of Forest Service Lands
  • Watershed Condition of National Forest Lands
  • Transmission of Wildfire Exposure from National Forests to the Wildland Urban Interface
  • Burn Probability of National Forest Lands

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2. Five Anthropogenic Factors That Will Radically Alter Forest Conditions and Management Needs in the Northern United States

US Forest Service (April 17) - The US Forest Service's Northern Research Station has issued a report—Five Anthropogenic Factors That Will Radically Alter Forest Conditions and Management Needs in the Northern United States.

The five factors identified the study are: Lack of age-class diversity, development pressure, invasive species, a low propensity for timber management, and increased management for nontimber objectives.

To download the study, visit the Northern Research Station website.

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3. Ecology Team Improves Understanding of Valley-Wide Stream Chemistry

Virginia Tech.edu (April 22) - A geostatistical approach for studying environmental conditions in stream networks and landscapes has been successfully applied at a valley-wide scale to assess headwater stream chemistry at high resolution, revealing unexpected patterns in natural chemical components.

According to researchers, understanding the chemistry of these streams at a finer scale could help to identify factors impairing water quality and help protect aquatic ecosystems.

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IV. SAF News

1. SAF Accepting Nominations for Vice-President and Council

The Society of American Foresters is now accepting nominations for vice-president and Council. Information and nominating procedures are available on the SAF website.

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2. Need Money for School? Apply for a Ben Meadows Natural Resources Scholarship

Once again, the Society of American Foresters is pleased to announce two scholarships offered by Ben Meadows and administered by SAF. The scholarships, one for academic achievement and one based on leadership, are each worth $2,500.

Applications are due by June 30, 2014. Instructions, complete requirements, and the application form can be found on the Ben Meadows website.

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3. 2014 SAF Convention News—Info on Everything from Airfare to Presentations

Pre-Convention Program Now Available

The Pre-Convention Brochure for 2014 SAF National Convention & CIF/IFC
AGM & Conference is now available on the SAF website.

Special Discounted Air Travel to Convention!
Salt Lake City has a large international airport and travel to and from this location can be direct through a number of other international airports across the country. SAF/CIF have formed a partnership with Delta and American Airlines to offers discounted airfare for convention attendees.

To Book Your Flight with Delta Airlines:

Visit the Delta website, select "Book A Trip," click on "More Search Options," and enter the meeting event code (NMHSJ) in the box provided on the Search Flight page. Reservations may also be made by calling Delta Meeting reservations at 1-800-328-1111 Monday-Friday 7am-7pm CDT.

To Book Your Flight with American Airlines:

Visit the American Airlines website, select your flight options, use discount code 79H4BR, and select "Book Now" to make your fight reservation.

Note: To avoid a ticketing charge, make your American Airline reservations online.

For comprehensive convention travel information, visit the SAF Convention website.

Hotel Reservations for 2014 SAF Convention Now Open!

In 2014, SAF will partner with the Canadian Institute of Forestry/l'Institut forestier du Canada (CIF/IFC), for a joint convention. In addition, the convention will be co-located with the International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO) World Congress, which only takes place once every 5 years and has not been hosted in the United States since 1971.

Given this historic gathering, we recommend that people book their rooms early! To do that, go to the SAF convention website and click on the "Reservations" link.

For more information about the gathering, visit the SAF convention website, which will be updated periodically as new information becomes available.

2014 SAF/CIF Call for Posters

In 2014, SAF will partner with the Canadian Institute of Forestry/l'Institut forestier du Canada (CIF/IFC) for our national convention. In addition, the convention will be co-located with the International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO) World Congress.

Click here for more information about the 2014 convention.  Click here for information on submitting a poster abstract.

Poster submissions deadline: September 1, 2014

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4. SAF Members: Give Us Your Comments on the Internal Communications Survey

The final SAF internal communications survey report has been presented to and accepted by the SAF Council. Now the Council's Strategic Planning Committee has requested that the three most important recommendations be identified for further SAF attention and action by May 15, 2014.

Therefore, SAF members are invited to review the report and provide comments on the survey's findings and recommendations. Any comments regarding the relative importance and priority of the report's recommendations should be provided before May 15. Other comments regarding the report may be provided at any time, and will be used when future opportunities occur.

Send all comments to: Jim Culbert. To access the report, visit the SAF website.

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5. Meetings

North American Summit on Forest Science Education
May 7-9 (general schedule available HERE)
Clark Kerr Campus, UC Berkeley

The Berkeley Summit is designed to produce recommendations on forest science and forestry education by engaging a select group of leaders in universities, forestry employers, and students. These recommendations will provide input to the forestry accreditation process and provide guidance to the development of university curriculum, and critically evaluate the role of education in forestland stewardship.

For more information or to register, visit the summit website.

Washington SAF Annual Meeting
May 7-9
www.forestry.org
Pack Forest, Eatonville, WA
Category 1-CF Hours: 12.5
Contact: Tom Hanson
E-mail: tom.hanson@amforem.biz
Phone: (425) 820-3420

EK SAF 2014 Spring Meeting
May 13
Kentucky Hardwoods/Somerset Hardwood Flooring
Somerset, KY
Category 1-CF Hours: 2.0
Contact: Christopher Reeves
E-mail: Christopher.Reeves@uky.edu
Phone: (859) 257-0174

Symposium on Forestry Best Management Practice Effectiveness in the Eastern United States

The National Council for Air and Stream Improvement, in conjunction with the Society of American Foresters and Virginia Tech, will host a Symposium on Forestry Best Management Practice (BMP) Effectiveness in the Eastern United States May 12-15 at the Inn at Virginia Tech and Skelton Conference Center in Blacksburg, Virginia.

The Symposium will feature two days of technical sessions and a full-day field tour. Technical session topics will include forestry BMP influences on in-stream biological processes and aquatic species; hydrologic responses of sediment, nutrients and chemicals at multiple scales (e.g., stream reach, road segment, and watershed scale); modeling BMP effectiveness; the legal context of BMP effectiveness; and BMP effectiveness monitoring costs.

To register, or for more information, visit the symposium website or contact Erik Schilling at (352) 244-0969.

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About The E-Forester:

A Benefit of SAF Membership:
The E-Forester is sent to SAF members in good standing each week.

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The E-Forester will no longer include announcements for forestry events, gatherings, or tours not (co)sponsored by SAF.

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