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April 11, 2014

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E-Forester Archives? More than a few folks have asked if The E-Forester is archived on the SAF website. It is not, primarily because links to news articles change quickly. However, if you're looking for something from a past issue, contact me and I'll do my best to get you what you need.

I. Featured News

1. California Issues First Forestry Offsets for Carbon Market
2. Forestry Officials Say Kentucky's Forestry Industry Is Making a Comeback Due to the Increasing Global Popularity of Whiskey and Bourbon
3. AEP Removing Homes' Infested Ash Trees that Threaten Power Lines
4. Forest Service to Move Forward with Watershed Work
5. Wildfire News: Preparations in Oregon, Guard Gears Up in California, and Air-Tanker Bid Protest Upheld

Forest Products Industry

6. Concerns over Beetle-Kill Estimates in British Columbia and Potential Clearcutting in Oregon
7. Abitibi Lumber Rights Sold and Fortress Paper Disappointed with China
8. Biomass News

Federal Lands Management

9. Bullock Asks US Forest Service to Focus Restoration on 5 Million Acres in State
10. Touring the Burn: Lawmakers Visit Lolo Creek Complex Fire Site to Discuss Prevention
11. Forest Restoration Thinning Underway
12. BLM Slowly Rolling Out Timber Sales from Last Summer's Fires
13. Committee Passes Bill to Preserve Forestland

II. Publications, Resources, and Items of Interest

1. Reports Question Role of Forests as Safety Nets, Link Forest Health and Climate Change
2. Poachers Attack Beloved Elders of California, Its Redwoods
3. Storm Caused Heavy Damage to Timber, but 2004 Ice Storm, Hurricane Hugo Were Worse

III. Science and Technology

1. Spectral Imaging Satellites Monitor Global Vegetation Health
2. Trees Go High-Tech: Process Turns Cellulose into Energy Storage Devices
3. Salamander's Hefty Role in the Forest

IV. SAF News

1. SAF Accepting Nominations for Vice-President and Council
2. 2014 SAF Convention News-Info on Everything from Airfare to Presentations
3. Symposium on Forestry Best Management Practice Effectiveness in the Eastern United States
4. SAF Meetings
5. Journal of Forestry March 2014 Issue Now Online


I. Featured News

All of these items and more appear in the "Featured News" section on the SAF home page

1. California Issues First Forestry Offsets for Carbon Market

Reuters.com (April 10) - California air regulators have issued the first carbon offset credits for a forest protection project, credits that power companies and others large emitters can use to meet their compliance obligations under the state's greenhouse gas reduction program.

The California Air Resources Board, which administers the program, issued 836,619 offset credits for the Yurok Tribe Sustainable Forest Project, which covers about 8,000 acres of tribal land in California's Humboldt County.

In return for the credits, the landowners have agreed to maintain or increase carbon stored in the trees for more than 100 years. The land is the ancestral homeland of the Yurok Tribe.

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2. Forestry Officials Say Kentucky's Forestry Industry Is Making a Comeback Due to the Increasing Global Popularity of Whiskey and Bourbon

Kentucky.com (April 4) - Forestry officials say the growing popularity of bourbon and whiskey worldwide is helping bring back Kentucky's forest and wood-products industry.

The good news came in the Kentucky Forestry Economic Impact Report for 2013-2014, which was released on April 3.

UK forestry extension professor Jeff Stringer, who cowrote the report, told The Courier-Journal the industry is coming back from the recession that caused it to tank in 2009. In 2013, the industry pumped $7.9 billion into the state's economy-putting it on par with the with the state's tourism industry.

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3. AEP Removing Homes' Infested Ash Trees that Threaten Power Lines

Columbus Dispatch.com (April 5) - Dead and dying ash trees from Columbus to Newark are getting the pink-stripe treatment as American Electric Power looks to eradicate the risk of the doomed trees pulling down power lines on their way to the ground.

It's a new twist to the power company's vegetation-management program, said spokeswoman Terri Flora, going beyond trimming unruly limbs and clearing dead trees from the utility right-of-way.

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4. Forest Service to Move Forward with Watershed Work

Helena Independent Record.com (April 9) - The Helena National Forest has announced plans to move forward with a forest restoration project aimed at protecting 80 percent of Helena's water supply.

The Red Mountain Flume Chessman Reservoir Project- part of a partnership between the US Forest Service and the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service-is intended to improve the health of forests on both public and private lands. Both Forest Service and city officials worry that a wildfire in beetle-killed lodgepole pine could damage the city's water supply.

The project, which is expected to take up to eight years to complete, calls for work on 490 acres. It includes clearcutting, as well as leaving some trees on more than 300 acres, and building fuel breaks on another 158 acres.

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5. Wildfire News: Preparations in Oregon, Guard Gears Up in California, and Air-Tanker Bid Protest Upheld

Will Low Snowpack Year Mean More Forest Fires?

Statesman Journal.com (April 6) - Record-breaking forest fires last year busted Oregon's firefighting budget, choked recreation sites with dangerous smoke, threatened hundreds of homes, and cost three firefighters their lives.

This year, already, dry winter weather kindled unusual January forest fires in northwest Oregon and a fire weather watch for all of southwest Oregon.

Oregon Department of Forestry officials say they can't predict what will happen this year, and they're not doing anything out of the ordinary to prepare.

California Guard Soldiers Gear Up for Fire Season

DVIDS.com (April 6) - With the terrible drought California is currently facing, the upcoming fire season and the inevitability of large-scale wildfires might seem daunting to anyone new to the firefighting mission.

The California National Guard and the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (Cal Fire) kicked off this year's highly anticipated fire season with it's annual joint training at the Cal Fire training Academy in Ione, April 5.

Air-Tanker Bid Protests Upheld

Daily Interlake.com (April 3) - A federal auditing agency has upheld a challenge to a US Forest Service contract for two next-generation air tankers to fight wildfires. But it was not yet clear what impact the decision might have on the federal air tanker fleet this summer.

Three competing air tanker companies objected to a sole-source contract the Forest Service awarded to Neptune Aviation Services in Missoula. It calls for paying up to $496 million over nine years for exclusive use of two BAE-146 aircraft.

The Government Accountability Office said the Forest Service should either bolster its justification for considering just one company or redo the bidding.

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Forest Products Industry

6. Concerns over Beetle-Kill Estimates in BC and Potential Clearcutting in Oregon

Beetle Wood Salvage Estimates Ring Alarm Bells

Business in Vancounver.com (April 8) - Forest companies are harvesting less dead pine while increasing their green timber harvests in some Interior regions of British Columbia hardest hit by the mountain pine beetle, according to a Forest Practices Board report.

The report, which was released last week, raises concerns that there will not be as much timber as expected when the beetle salvage program is over.

Timber Company Says It Will Clearcut If It Buys Public Forestland

Oregon Public Broadcasting.com (April 3) - The Seneca Jones Timber Company's bid to purchase a 788-acre parcel of the Elliott State Forest in the Oregon Coast Range is hitting a nerve with environmentalists who say it could lead to logging on the habitat of species protected by state and federal laws.

Kathy Jones and her two sisters co-own the Seneca Jones Timber Company and she freely acknowledged that clearcuts would take place. Jones' positive characterization of clearcutting rubs many Northwest residents wrong. Among them are environmental advocates who say tree plantations of Douglas-fir trees are no substitute for the native forests when it comes to protecting water quality, wildlife habitat, and biodiversity.

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7. Abitibi Lumber Rights Sold and Fortress Paper Disappointed with China

Former Abitibi Lumber Rights Sold to California Company

CBC.ca (April 8) - A company from California has won the harvesting rights to a large wood supply in central Newfoundland that once belonged to Abitibi-Bowater.

According to CBC News, Rentech now has ownership of the 280,000 cubic meters of wood that once belonged to the former newsprint producer, which shut down its Grand Falls-Windsor mill in early 2009.

Rentech, mainly a fertilizer company in the United States, is looking into producing wood pellets in Canada.

Vancouver's Fortress Paper "Very Disappointed" with China's Pulp Duty Decision

Business in Vancouver.com (April 4) - The Chinese government is sticking by its previous decision to impose a 13 percent duty on cellulose pulp coming from Canada, the United States, and Brazil-a move Vancouver-based Fortress Paper says will hurt business.

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8. Biomass News

Report Comes Under Fire for Citing Mill as "Dirty" Biomass Plant

Bangor Daily News.com (April 6) - An April 2 report from the Partnership for Policy Integrity found that permitted emissions from biomass-burning facilities are "dirtier" than those permitted at modern coal plants. Now critics of the report are challenging its findings and defending the use of biofuels as a comparatively "clean" and sustainable technology.

Critics say the report makes false assumptions and, from a wider environmental standpoint, neglects a key issue-namely, the impact of mining and other practices used to obtain nonrenewable fossil fuels used in other power generation facilities.

Related:

Biomass Battle: EPA in Crossfire between "Green" Industry and Environmental Concerns

Post and Courier.com (April 6) - The Environmental Protection Agency is scheduled this summer to reconsider toughening restrictions on the wood-burning plants. The second look comes on the heels of the EPA's controversial proposal to strictly limit how much pollution a household wood stove can emit.

The agency in 2010 put off the decision on the plants. However, an environmental group's report last week claimed that wood-burning plants pollute more than the coal plants, compared by the amount of electricity produced, and should be held to the same restrictions.

Lower North Fork Fire Survivor Scott Appel Is Turning Burned Trees into Renewable Energy for NREL

Denver Channel.com (April 3) - After losing everything in the Lower North Fork fire, Scott Appel wants to make a point by taking his time and energy to turn charred trees into renewable energy.

Appel is taking the charred logs, putting them through a wood chipper, and hauling the chips to the National Renewable Energy Lab in Golden, Colorado.

Study Looks at Wood Pellets as Potential Source of Jobs, Energy Savings

Winona Daily news.com (April 7) - The Coulee Region could save millions of dollars a year in energy costs, create more than a hundred jobs, and slash carbon dioxide emissions by creating a market for wood pellet fuel, according to a new study.

Commissioned by the Mississippi River Regional Planning Commission, the study grew out of meetings in the Kickapoo River Valley after the floods of 2007 and 2008, where discussions focused on how to create a more resilient economy.

Ameresco' Biomass Cogeneration Facility Uses Storm-Damaged Timber

AZO Cleantech.com (April 9) - Ameresco, Inc., has announced that its biomass cogeneration facility located at the US Department of Energy Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina, is utilizing storm-damaged timber as a result of the major ice storm, which impacted the southern US in February.

Since March 2014, the biomass cogeneration facility has received storm wood from Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell Counties in South Carolina, and Burke and Hancock Counties in Georgia. Ameresco estimates that it will convert over 30,000 tons of storm-damaged wood into renewable power at SRS this year.

UBC Researchers Genetically Engineer Trees for Biofuel, Pulp Processing

Business in Vancouver.com (April 3) - What happens when you chop down a genetically engineered tree?

It grows right back-at least in the case of a species modified by University of British Columbia researchers who designed trees that are easier to break down into biofuel and pulp.

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Federal Lands Management

9. Bullock Asks US Forest Service to Focus Restoration on 5 Million Acres in State

Missoulian.com (April 7) - Gov. Steve Bullock has asked the US Forest Service to concentrate its restoration efforts on five million acres of timberland local advocates believe are most at risk from insect damage in the next 15 years.

A provision in the recently passed federal farm bill asked governors across the nation to advise the Forest Service on priority landscapes where they'd like the agency to focus its management efforts.

More:

Montana Gov. Asks Forest Service to Focus on 5 Million Acres
Montana Standard.com (April 8)

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10. Touring the Burn: Lawmakers Visit Lolo Creek Complex Fire Site to Discuss Prevention

Missoulian.com (April 9) - A group of state legislators recently met with Bitterroot Valley fire managers and Montana Department of Natural Resources forestry officials to tour the remains of the 11,000-acre Lolo Creek Complex fire that ripped through the Highway 12 corridor west of Lolo this past August.

The lightning-caused and wind-whipped blaze burned four houses and forced the evacuation of scores of people who lived in the area. The group met to look at the fire with the benefit of hindsight-and to discuss how similar fires in populated areas could be dealt with in the future.

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11. Forest Restoration Thinning Underway

Payson Roundup.com (April 4) - The Four Forest Restoration Initiative contractor Good Earth Power AZ wants to build a mill to handle millions of tons of small trees in Williams instead of Winslow, the latest wrinkle in a high-stakes forest thinning project on which Rim Country's future may well depend.

The Forest Service has already approved the firm's request to shift operations to Williams, which is farther from the bulk of the land that needs thinning.

Although some question the move, company officials say that a Williams location east of Flagstaff will prove more convenient for the early projects already underway, most of which are in the Kaibab and Coconino National Forests around Flagstaff and up toward the Grand Canyon.

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12. BLM Slowly Rolling Out Timber Sales from Last Summer's Fires

Wallowa.com (April 5) - Long awaited by timber bidders, the first burned timber from last summer's devastating fires in Oregon will be put up for auction by the Bureau of Land Management on April 24.

The Stratton-Brimstone salvage, 15 miles northwest of Grants Pass, covers 137 acres classified as matrix-set aside for logging-by the 1994 Northwest Plan. The BLM estimates it will produce 3 million board feet.

However, some in the Oregon's forest products industry believe more trees should be coming out faster from the BLM portion of the nearby Douglas Complex fires, which burned close to 50,000 acres.

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13. Committee Passes Bill to Preserve Forestland

Daily Times.com (April 9) - The Senate Agriculture Committee has passed by voice vote legislation by Tennessee Sens. Lamar Alexander (R) and Bob Corker (R) that would designate nearly 20,000 acres in six areas of the Cherokee National Forest as wilderness areas.

Alexander and Corker first introduced the Tennessee Wilderness Act in 2010, and the US Forest Service recommended it in 2004. Designation as a wilderness area is the highest level of conservation protection to preserve land.

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II. Publications, Resources, and Items of Interest

1. Reports Question Role of Forests as Safety Nets, Link Forest Health and Climate ChangeReports Question Role of Forests as Safety Nets, Link Forest Health and Climate Change

Global Study Questions Primary Role of Forests as Safety Nets

CIFOR.org (April 8) - Forest resources may be less important as a buffer between harvests and in times of hardship than previously believed, according to a recent global study.

The study, a product of the Poverty and Environment Network (PEN), a collaborative effort led by the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), found that barely one out of 10 households ranks extracting natural forest or other noncultivated resources as its first response to an emergency.

This challenges the findings of previous research suggesting that forests provide a key "natural insurance policy" to poor rural households in developing countries in times of crisis.

Forest Report Links Forest Health and Climate Change

Aspen Daily news.com (April 7) - The Aspen Center for Environmental Studies last week released its first annual State of the Forest Report, cataloging recent trends affecting forest health in the Roaring Fork River watershed and tackling events like drought, fire, disease, and infestation.

The root cause for changes in the local forest is climate change, the report concludes, creating a warmer, drier, more fire-prone, and less resilient forest ecosystem.

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2. Poachers Attack Beloved Elders of California, Its Redwoods

New York Times.com (April 9) - It was an unlikely crime scene: a steep trail used by bears leading to a redwood grove. There, a rare old-growth coast redwood had been brutally hacked about 15 times by poachers, a chain saw massacre that had exposed the tree's deep red heartwood.

The thieves were after the burls, gnarly protrusions on the trees that are prized for their intricately patterned wood. Although timber theft has long plagued public lands, a recent spate of burl poaching, with 18 known cases in the last year, has forced park officials to close an eight-mile drive through old-growth forests-the Newton B. Drury Scenic Parkway-at night to deter criminals.

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3. Storm Caused Heavy Damage to Timber, but 2004 Ice Storm, Hurricane Hugo Were Worse

Times and Democrat.com (April 6) - Some South Carolina landowners left reeling after the February 2014 ice storm have compared it to Hurricane Hugo in the amount of damage the storm left behind.

Statewide, the February storm damaged 1.5 million acres over a 170-mile-long path across 21 counties, including Bamberg, Calhoun, and Orangeburg counties, the South Carolina Forestry Commission says. The industry suffered about $360 million in damage.

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III. Science and Technology

1. Spectral Imaging Satellites Monitor Global Vegetation Health

Laser Focus World.com (April 7) - 2013-2014 brought floods to Europe and plunged the eastern United States into a "polar vortex" winter, all while the western United States continued to suffer through a serious drought. Because such severe weather patterns have serious impacts on croplands and forest cover, aircraft- and satellite-based imaging systems are being increasingly deployed to monitor soil and vegetation health.

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2. Trees Go High-Tech: Process Turns Cellulose into Energy Storage Devices

Oregon State University (April 7) - Based on a fundamental chemical discovery by scientists at Oregon State University (OSU), it appears that trees may soon play a major role in making high-tech energy storage devices.

OSU chemists have found that cellulose-the most abundant organic polymer on Earth and a key component of trees-can be heated in a furnace in the presence of ammonia, and turned into the building blocks for supercapacitors.

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3. Salamander's Hefty Role in the Forest

New York Times.com (April 7) - If someone asked you to name the top predator in North American forests, you might think of bears, or maybe great horned owls. But here's another answer to think about: woodland salamanders.

They are hugely abundant and very hungry. On an average day, a salamander eats 20 ants of all sizes, two fly or beetle larvae, one adult beetle, and half of an insect called the springtail. And in doing so, they collectively affect the entire course of life in the forest-and perhaps far beyond.

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IV. SAF News

SAF Accepting Nominations for Vice-President and Council

The Society of American Foresters is now accepting nominations for vice-president and Council. Information and nominating procedures are available on the SAF website.

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2. 2014 SAF Convention News—Info on Everything from Airfare to Presentations

Pre-Convention Program Now Available

The Pre-Convention Brochure for 2014 SAF National Convention & CIF/IFC
AGM & Conference is now available on the SAF website.

Special Discounted Air Travel to Convention!
Salt Lake City has a large international airport and travel to and from this location can be direct through a number of other international airports across the country. SAF/CIF have formed a partnership with Delta and American Airlines to offers discounted airfare for convention attendees.

To Book Your Flight with Delta Airlines:

Visit the Delta website, select "Book A Trip," click on "More Search Options," and enter the meeting event code (NMHSJ) in the box provided on the Search Flight page. Reservations may also be made by calling Delta Meeting reservations at 1-800-328-1111 Monday-Friday 7am-7pm CDT.

To Book Your Flight with American Airlines:

Visit the American Airlines website, select your flight options, use discount code 79H4BR, and select "Book Now" to make your fight reservation.

Note: To avoid a ticketing charge, make your American Airline reservations online.

For comprehensive convention travel information, visit the SAF Convention website.

Hotel Reservations for 2014 SAF Convention Now Open!

In 2014, SAF will partner with the Canadian Institute of Forestry/l'Institut forestier du Canada (CIF/IFC), for a joint convention. In addition, the convention will be co-located with the International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO) World Congress, which only takes place once every 5 years and has not been hosted in the United States since 1971.

Given this historic gathering, we recommend that people book their rooms early! To do that, go to the SAF convention website and click on the "Reservations" link.

For more information about the gathering, visit the SAF convention website, which will be updated periodically as new information becomes available.

2014 SAF/CIF Call for Posters

In 2014, SAF will partner with the Canadian Institute of Forestry/l'Institut forestier du Canada (CIF/IFC) for our national convention. In addition, the convention will be co-located with the International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO) World Congress.

Click here for more information about the 2014 convention.  Click here for information on submitting a poster abstract.

Poster submissions deadline: September 1, 2014

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3. Symposium on Forestry Best Management Practice Effectiveness in the Eastern United States

The National Council for Air and Stream Improvement, in conjunction with the Society of American Foresters and Virginia Tech, will host a Symposium on Forestry Best Management Practice (BMP) Effectiveness in the Eastern United States May 12-15 at the Inn at Virginia Tech and Skelton Conference Center in Blacksburg, Virginia.

The Symposium will feature two days of technical sessions and a full-day field tour. Technical session topics will include forestry BMP influences on in-stream biological processes and aquatic species; hydrologic responses of sediment, nutrients and chemicals at multiple scales (e.g., stream reach, road segment, and watershed scale); modeling BMP effectiveness; the legal context of BMP effectiveness; and BMP effectiveness monitoring costs.

To register, or for more information, visit the symposium website or contact Erik Schilling at (352) 244-0969.

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4. SAF Meetings

Colorado-Wyoming Spring Meeting

The Colorado-Wyoming SAF spring Meeting will take place April 24- 26 at the Antlers Hilton, Colorado Springs, Colorado. The theme of the meeting is "Restoration, Recovery, and Resilience" and the event includes a half-day GIS training, a diverse backgound of guest speakers, and field tour of Waldo Canyon burn and restoration efforts.

For more information or to register, visit the Colorado-Wyoming SAF's website or contact Deb Grieco at (303) 324-2955. The meeting offers 2.5 category 1 and 13.5 category 2 CFE credits.

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5. Journal of Forestry March 2014 Issue Now Online

Check out the expanded table of contents for the March 2014 issue of the Journal of Forestry to discover the research, practices, and techniques that will help you succeed in your forest management goals. Quickly scan the titles and abstracts of the articles appearing within the latest issue, browse the management and policy implications to discover which have direct implications to your work, then follow the links to the full text of the articles online.

Full access to the online edition is included with SAF membership at the GOLD and PLATINUM levels. Haven't used the online edition before? Register here or contact Matthew Walls for assistance.

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About The E-Forester:

A Benefit of SAF Membership:
The E-Forester is sent to SAF members in good standing each week.

Disclaimer:
The Society of American Foresters does not necessarily endorse the views expressed in the news items and/or links to additional information that appear in The E-Forester.

Meeting Announcements:
The E-Forester will no longer include announcements for forestry events, gatherings, or tours not (co)sponsored by SAF.

Feedback:
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