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August 22, 2014

Did you know SAF members can receive bundles of the "You Need a Forester" brochure? To get your copies, just email SAF's member services department.


E-Forester Archives? More than a few folks have asked if The E-Forester is archived on the SAF website. It is not, primarily because links to news articles change quickly. However, if you're looking for something from a past issue, contact me and I'll do my best to get you what you need.

I. Featured News

1. New Report Shows Budget Impact of Rising Firefighting Costs
2. Urban Forestry News: Committee Considers Fee to Fund for EAB Fight, New York's Tree-Pruning Program under Fire
3. NOAA Analysis Reveals Significant Land Cover Changes
4. Wildfire News
5. Op-Eds by SAF Members

Forest Products Industry

6. As Fungus Kills Bats, Minnesota Timber Industry Winces, Rayonier No Longer Offering Free Access to Property in the Fall
7. EU Ratification Helps Push Indonesian Timber Exports
8. Biomass News

Federal Lands Management & Policy News

9. Salazar, Sportsmen Angry over Utah-Led Public Lands Movement
10. President Obama May Declare San Gabriel Mountains a National Monument
11. What Would Cable Logging Mean for Flagstaff's Watershed Project?
12. Wyden: Congress Can Pass Wildfire, O&C Bills This Year
13. Senators Look at Forestry Issues in Northern Wisconsin

II. Publications, Resources, and Items of Interest

1. History: Michigan Tech Site Once Produced Wood for Ford, Early Wood Manufacturing Powered by Water
2. The Japanese Have an Entire Field of Research Devoted to Chillin' in the Forest
3. Research You May Be Missing

III. Science and Technology

1. Genome Could Unlock Potential for Paper, Fuel; Geneticists Develop Tree Biomass Crop to Grow on Marginal Lands
2. Spotlight: Trees and Climate
3. Changes at Streamside in the Southern Appalachians

IV. SAF News

1. 2014 SAF Elections and Referenda
2. National Committee Openings Available
3. 2014 SAF Convention News—Info on Everything from Airfare to Presentations
4. Picture the Past


I. Featured News

All of these items and more appear in the "Featured News" section on the SAF home page

1. New Report Shows Budget Impact of Rising Firefighting Costs

USDA.gov (August 20) - Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack has announced a new report showing that, as the cost of fighting forest fires has rapidly increased over the last 20 years, the budgets for other forest programs, including those that can help prevent and mitigate fire damage, have substantially shrunk. The Forest Service's firefighting appropriation has rapidly risen as a proportion of the Forest Service's overall budget, increasing from 16 percent in 1995 to 42 percent today, forcing cuts in other budget areas.

More:

Forest Service Requests More Fire Funding
Statesman Journal.com (August 20)

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2. Urban Forestry News: Committee Considers Fee to Fund EAB Fight, New York's Tree-Pruning Program under Fire

Committee to Take Up Fee to Fund Emerald Ash Borer Fight

Madison.com (August 19) - A Madison committee this week will take a look at a plan to assess a special charge to fund urban forestry costs, which are ballooning because of the emerald ash borer invasion.

Faced with state-imposed property tax caps, the city is struggling with how to fund the costs of the urban forestry program, which are expected to increase from the 2013, pre-ash borer amount of $3.7 million to $4.2 million in 2014 and $5.9 million in 2015.

Comptroller's Report Criticizes New York's Tree-Pruning Program

New York Times.com (August 17) - Well before tree limbs start sagging under winter snow or swaying in stiff winds, the city is looking to pare the most vulnerable branches.

But, according to an audit released by New York City Comptroller Scott M. Stringer, that effort is plagued by haphazard planning and lax oversight, raising concern among city officials that untended branches could fall and injure people.

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3. NOAA Analysis Reveals Significant Land Cover Changes

SpaceDaily.com (August 19) - A new National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration nationwide analysis shows that between 1996 and 2011, 64,975 square miles in coastal regions-an area larger than the state of Wisconsin-experienced changes in land cover, including a decline in wetlands and forest cover with development a major contributing factor.

Among the significant changes were the loss of 1,536 square miles of wetlands, and a decline in total forest cover by 6.1 percent.

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4. Wildfire News

NIFC.gov (August 20) - The National Interagency Fire Center reports that, "Firefighters continue to make good progress on the large fires in Oregon and Washington. The 15 large fires in the Northwest had very little growth yesterday. Active fire behavior was observed on several large fires in California. Two new large fires were reported in Louisiana and Montana."

In other wildfire news:

Technology Will Make Mapping Fires More Timely, Accurate
Gazette.com (August 18)

The Forest Service Is Building a Firefighting Airforce
OutsideOnline.com (August 18)

Bigger, Faster Air Tankers Help Forest Service Tackle Wildfires
NEPR.net (August 18)

In Idaho, Tracing What Remains after the Flames
New York Times.com (August 17)

Rim Fire:

Analysis Shows Thinned Forests Were No Match for Last Year's Mega-Fire in California

EENEws.net (August 20) - A recently published analysis of Yosemite land burned during the record-breaking Rim Fire demonstrates that when blazes become extreme-so large and hot that they create their own independent weather patterns-they can easily destroy forests that have been restored, or thinned of underbrush, through recent controlled burns.

More:

A Year after Rim Fire, Debate Sparks over Replanting Trees
KQED.org (August 18)

One Year after Calif. Rim Fire, Debate Simmers over Forest Recovery
NPR.org (August 18)

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5. Op-Eds by SAF Members

Thinning Oregon's Dry-Side Forests Cuts Fire Risk
By Max Bennett and Stephen Fitzgerald
Oregon Live.com (August 16)

"Scientific research and experience from recent wildfires show that carefully thinned areas experience lower-intensity fire and less tree mortality. A large body of evidence has emerged over the past 20 years that suggests that active management-done correctly-can reduce fire intensity and severity, increasing the chance that the forest overstory will survive a wildfire. There are other ecological benefits of active management, too."

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Forest Products Industry

6. As Fungus Kills Bats, Minnesota Timber Industry Winces, Rayonier No Longer Offering Free Access to Property in the Fall

As Fungus Kills Bats, Minnesota Timber Industry Winces

Star Tribune.com (August 19) - A cave fungus that's killing millions of bats across the country is threatening to become a big problem for Minnesota's timber industry.

The US Fish and Wildlife Service will decide next spring whether to add the northern long-eared bat, which is being wiped out in places by the disease called white-nose syndrome, to the endangered species list.

Such a decision would trigger a blanket prohibition against killing the bats, even accidentally. That would halt logging in much of the country during warm months, when the little animals roost in the forest and raise their vulnerable young in trees.

Rayonier No Longer Offering Free Access to Property in the Fall

TDN.com (August 14) - Rayonier has expanded its permit system for access during hunting season and no longer offers free access to its property in the fall.

Rayonier's problems with theft and garbage are cited by other timber companies that have restricted public access to their lands. Though Rayonier started its permit system earlier, Weyerhaeuser has imposed similar fee programs the past few years in southwest Washington.

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7. EU Ratification Helps Push Indonesian Timber Exports

EcoBusiness.com (August 15) - The ratification of an international agreement to curb illegal timber trade early this year has contributed to an increase in exports of Indonesia's forestry products.

According to data issued by the Forestry Ministry, exports of forest products rose 11.8 percent in the first half of this year to $3.8 billion (US) from $3.4 billion in the same period last year.

Forestry Minister Zulkifli Hasan said the ratification of the agreement by the European Union (EU) in March helped spur exports of Indonesia's forestry products to the EU countries in recent months.

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8. Biomass News

Pellet Plant Bringing 35 Jobs to Pine Bluff

Arkansas Matters.com (August 20) - Highland Pellets LLC, an Arkansas company, announced the building of a 500,000 metric ton per year wood pellet facility in Pine Bluff. The $130 million plant will create more than 35 direct jobs and an additional 482 indirect jobs with a direct financial impact of $86 million annually that will benefit local communities.

Highland Pellets is a privately held company with industry veterans from the wood pellet, finance, and energy markets. Wood pellets are a sustainably sourced feedstock for use by European industrial utilities to lower their carbon footprint and provide sustainable base load power.

Biofuels Company Eyes Richmond County

YourDailyJournal.com (North Carolina, August 20) - A Maryland-based biofuels company wants to build several new facilities in the region, including one in Richmond County.

Enviva, a biomass fuel producer, has proposed the construction of wood-pellet plants in Richmond and Sampson counties, as well as one in South Carolina.

The three plants would export their product through a proposed terminal at the Port of Wilmington, Delaware.

Wood Pellet Plant: Economic Growth vs. Environmental Effects

FayObserver.com (August 18) - By the end of 2015, if all goes as expected, a forest the size of Fayetteville will be fed into two huge processing plants to create energy for European industry.

That much everyone agrees on. Whether it's a good thing remains a subject of debate.

Loggers, forestry experts, and state officials say the construction of two plants by wood pellet manufacturer Enviva will spur economic growth. Environmental interests decry the increase of forest harvest and a loss of wildlife habitat.

Renewable Energy Could Hit 36 Percent of Global Energy Use, but There's a Catch

EnergyCollective.com (August 20) - The International Renewable Energy Agency's (IRENA) REmap 2030 report lays out a five-step roadmap for scaling renewable energy up to 36 percent of the world's total final energy consumption (TFEC), cutting coal use 26 percent and oil/gas use 15 percent, and keeping atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations below 450 parts per million.

But there's a catch-IRENA's recommendations center on expanding power from biomass. It's arguably the most controversial renewable energy source, and uncertainties about technology and reported volumes could undercut potential of the world's sustainable energy future.

Dutch Researchers Develop Catalyst to Get Oil from Biomass

Domestic Fuel.com (August 19) - Researchers in The Netherlands have developed a catalyst that helps get more energy from biomass to more closely match more conventional sources of oil-based energy. This article from the University of Twente says the new, simple catalyst improves the quality of this oil before it is even transported to the refinery and was selected as part of the follow-up technology from CATCHBIO, the national research program looking to make sure Europe achieves 20 percent of its fuel from renewable sources by 2020.

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Federal Lands Management and Forest Policy News

9. Salazar, Sportsmen Angry over Utah-Led Public Lands Movement

KSL.com (August 16) - A states' rights, public lands movement with its genesis in Utah was blasted by former Interior Secretary Ken Salazar as an effort that threatens to undo the successes of American conservation policy.

The Transfer of Public Lands Act was passed in Utah two years ago and calls on the federal government to cede title to lands that some say were supposed to be "disposed" of at statehood.

The law is at the center of a movement that has gained political traction among Utah's neighbors and sympathetic support from critics who say the federal government has too much control in the West.

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10. President Obama May Declare San Gabriel Mountains a National Monument

ContraCostaTimes.com (August 20) - President Obama was asked by a local congresswoman to exercise his executive powers to declare 600,000 acres of the San Gabriel Mountains a national monument, a unilateral action that would bypass Congressional approval.

Out of frustration for the slow pace of her bill, Rep. Judy Chu (D) announced in a news conference that she has had discussions with the White House to act alone and do essentially what her bill proposes-add more federal resources to the heavily-used Angeles and San Bernardino national forests for better recreation, trail upkeep, and trash removal.

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11.What Would Cable Logging Mean for Flagstaff's Watershed Project?

KNAU.org (August 4) - The Flagstaff Watershed Protection Project is a major forest-thinning initiative set to begin in 2015. It's designed to safeguard vulnerable areas near Flagstaff against wildfire and mitigate some of its most destructive after effects. In 2012, Flagstaff voters approved $10 million for the project and now the Forest Service has proposed four options for possible treatments, including cable logging, something never before done in the area.

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12. Wyden: Congress Can Pass Wildfire, O&C Bills This Year

Portland Tribune.com (August 21) - US Sen. Ron Wyden wants to resolve two issues affecting federal forests before the end of the current Congress.

One is a shift in how the federal government pays for fighting the biggest wildfires in national forests. Those costs have consumed larger shares of the US Forest Service budget over the past two decades and forced it to tap money meant for conservation or fire prevention work.

The other is how federal forest lands in western Oregon, once owned by the Oregon & California (O&C) Railroad, should be managed for timber production, environmental protection, and county benefits.

Although senators may be close to agreement, their versions differ from what their House counterparts want or have passed.

More:

Counties Object to Wyden's Latest O&C Plan

Bend Bulletin.com (August 15) - The Association of O&C Counties wants increased certainty on timber harvests and revenues before it will endorse Sen. Ron Wyden's latest revision to his proposed management plan for more than 2 million forested acres in western Oregon.

Last month, just before the Senate broke for its August recess, Wyden (D-OR) introduced a new version of his O&C legislation, tweaked slightly from the version he introduced in 2013.

The new bill expands the land in question beyond the 2.4 million acres of O&C land to include an additional 250,000 acres of public domain land currently overseen by the Bureau of Land Management.

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13. Senators Look at Forestry Issues in Northern Wisconsin

WRN.com (August 20) - Wisconsin's two US senators are taking a closer look at issues facing the forestry and timber industries in northern Wisconsin.

Ron Johnson (R) toured Forest County and national forestland with representatives from the Great lakes Timber Professionals, while Tammy Baldwin (D) toured the Nicolet Hardwoods sawmill in Laona.

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II. Publications, Resources, and Items of Interest

1. History: Michigan Tech Site Once Produced Wood for Ford, Early Wood Manufacturing Powered by Water

Michigan Tech Site Once Produced Wood for Ford

Washington Times.com (August 19) - The site that sprang out of Henry Ford's desire to produce wood for his automobiles continues on as a Michigan Technological University site for forest research.

Early Wood Manufacturing Powered by Water

New Hampshire Public Radio.org (August 15) - Early New Hampshire manufacturing relied on rivers to produce an endless array of wood products from lumber to clothespins. A half-mile stretch of the Lane River on "Corporation Hill" in Sutton produced a litany of wood products: lumber, clapboards, shingles, bobbins, clothespins, excelsior, lathing, windows, doors, shutters, wagons and carriages, and associated components.

Even modest falls of water were harnessed for wood manufacturing because poor roads made it impossible to haul timber long distances.

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2. The Japanese Have an Entire Field of Research Devoted to Chillin' in the Forest

Motherboard.vice.com (August 20) - From Ralph Waldo Emerson to John Muir to Jean Craighead George, the English language has plenty of people using it to praise the restorative power of nature. All well and good, but it pales in comparison to what's going on in Japanese. In 1982, the Japanese Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, and Fisheries coined a phrase for "making contact with and taking in the atmosphere of the forest," and literally translates to "forest bathing": Shinrin-yoku.

And should you ever doubt the power of a snappy and concise name, shinrin-yoku is a legitimate field of scientific study, one that's working on preventative medicine that could be as simple as a walk in the woods.

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3. Research You May Be Missing

Interested in what your colleagues have been reading? Below are the top most downloaded articles from each of SAF's scientific journal publications for the month of July.

An Index for Logging Cost Changes across the US South (Journal of Forestry Vol. 112, No. 3)

Mountain Pine Beetle, a Major Disturbance Agent in US Western Coniferous Forests: A Synthesis of the State of Knowledge (Forest Science Vol. 60, No. 3)

To see the complete top 10 most downloaded article lists, visit the Publications page on the SAF website. Just click on the journal you wish to view, then click Most Downloaded Articles.

Your GOLD- or PLATINUM-level membership entitles you to free access to all journal content, but you need to register with IngentaConnect to get it. Questions? Contact Matthew Walls.

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III. Science and Technology

1. Genome Could Unlock Potential for Paper, Fuel; Geneticists Develop Tree Biomass Crop to Grow on Marginal Lands

Genome Could Unlock Potential for Paper, Fuel

NaturalResourcereport.com (August 18) - In a collaboration spanning five continents, scientists have announced the complete sequencing of one of the world's most widely planted trees, Eucalyptus grandis.

Used for fuel and timber, the species is valued for fast growth and straight grain. Grown usually as a hybrid, it is one of more than 500 species of eucalyptus trees and shrubs that provide a renewable source of fiber, pulp, biofuel material, and medicinal and industrial oils.

Forestry Geneticists Develop Tree Biomass Crop to Grow on Marginal Lands

VT.edu (August 19) - Two Virginia Tech researchers have received a $1.4 million grant to investigate the genetic regulatory networks that will allow an important bioenergy crop to be bred so it will grow in less than ideal soils and climate.

Populus, a genus of fast-growing trees commonly known as cottonwoods and aspens, is being grown for bioenergy because it produces a significant amount of biomass in two years and will re-grow robustly when cut at just above ground level. Woody biomass can be converted to liquid fuels, such as ethanol.

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2. Spotlight: Trees and Climate

New Analysis Links Tree Height to Climate

News.Wisc.edu (August 14) - What limits the height of trees? Is it the fraction of their photosynthetic energy they devote to productive new leaves? Or is it their ability to hoist water hundreds of feet into the air, supplying the green, solar-powered sugar factories in those leaves?

In research to be published in the journal Ecology, Thomas Givnish, a professor of botany at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, attempts to resolve this debate by studying how tree height, resource allocation, and physiology vary with climate in Victoria State, located in southeastern Australia.

Climate Change Taking a Huge Toll on World's Forests

Independent.ie (August 19) - The Finland-based European Forest Institute (EFI) has warned that Europe's forests are increasingly under pressure from wind, bark beetles, and forest fires.

The EFI says that climate change is already altering the environment and long-lived ecosystems such as forests are particularly vulnerable to rapid changes in the climate system.

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3. Changes at Streamside in the Southern Appalachians

US Forest Service (August 19) - The loss of eastern hemlock could affect water yield and storm flow from forest watersheds in the southern Appalachians, according to a new study by US Forest Service scientists at the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory located in Otto, North Carolina.

Because of its dense evergreen foliage, eastern hemlock plays an important role in the water cycle of southern Appalachian forests, regulating stream flow year round. Although eastern hemlock rarely dominates the region's forests, the tree is considered a foundation species in the streamside areas called riparian zones.

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IV. SAF News

1. 2014 SAF Elections and Referenda

The 2014 SAF national and unit elections and referendum votes will be held in October. All SAF members will receive a ballot and are encouraged to vote. To help you make informed decisions, the August 2014 issue of The Forestry Source features a special insert containing detailed information pertaining to the referenda, as well as a sample of this fall’s ballot. Information on the candidates for the SAF Council and the SAF vice-presidential elections will appear in the September issue of the Source.

If you have any questions on the votes, please feel free to contact SAF chief executive officer Matt Menashes.

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2. National Committee Openings Available

SAF currently has 13 national committees to help it accomplish its ongoing and long-term goals. If you’d like to volunteer your time and talents to help SAF meet its mission, see the list of committee openings in the July issue of The Forestry Source, available on the SAF website.

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3. 2014 SAF Convention News—Info on Everything from Airfare to Presentations

SAF 2014 Advance Convention Brochure Now Available!

The 2014 SAF National Convention advance brochure, which has information on everything you need to know about this year’s joint SAF/CIF meeting, is now available on the SAF website. Check it out!

Complete Scientific and Technical Concurrent Program Now Online

The complete scientific and technical concurrent program for this year’s convention is available online.

Volunteers Needed

If you're planning to attend the SAF/CIF convention or the IUFRO World Congress, please consider donating a few hours of your time to help the logistics of the co-located conferences run more smoothly!

SAF and CIF/IFC need volunteers to help with the Forests without Borders / Foresters and Science Fund silent auction and the SAF Store, as well as for the following specific jobs:

Registration Area Assistance
Wednesday, October 8
7:00-11:00 - 3 people
11:00-3:00 - 4 people
3:00-7:00 - 4 people

Thursday, October 9
7:00-11:00 - 3 people
11:00-3:00 - 3 people

Greeters at Convention South Center Entrance
Wednesday, October 8
7:00-11:00 - 1 person
11:00-3:00 - 1 person
3:00-7:00 - 1 person

Thursday, October 9
7:00-11:00 - 1 person

Exhibit Hall
Wednesday, October 8
8:00-11:00 - 2 people for set-up
11:00-2:00 - 2 people for set-up

Saturday, October 11
1:00-4:00 - 1 person for breakdown
4:00-8:00 - 1 person for breakdown

Speaker-Ready Room Technical Assistance Support

Wednesday, October 8
3:00-6:00 - 1 person

Foresters' Fund
Tuesday, October 7
10:00-4:00 - 2 people for set-up

Wednesday, October 8
10:00-1:00 - 2 for set-up
1:00-4:00 - 2 for set-up
4:00-6:00 - 5 people to disperse donation tickets
6:00-8:00 - 5 people to disperse donation tickets

Thursday, October 9
10:00-12:00 - 5 people to disperse donation tickets and 2 at the Foresters' Fund Table
12:00-3:00 - 5 people to disperse donation tickets and 2 at the Foresters' Fund Table
3:00-6:00 - 2 people to disperse donation tickets and 2 at the Foresters' Fund Table

Friday, October 10
8:00-10:00 - 2 people to disperse donation tickets and 2 at the Foresters' Fund Table
10:00-12:00 - 2 people at the Foresters' Fund Table
12:00-3:00 - 2 people at the Foresters' Fund Table
3:00-5:00 - 2 people at the Foresters' Fund Table

Saturday, October 11
10:00-12:00 - 2 people at the Foresters' Fund Table
12:00-2:00 - 2 people to help with close out

SAF Store

Oct 8 Wednesday: 5:00–8:30 pm 2 people
Oct 9 Thursday: 8:00–11:00 am 2 people
  Thursday 11:00am–2:00pm 2 people
  Thursday 2:00pm–6:00 pm 2 people
Oct 10 Friday: 8:00–11:00 am 2 people
  Friday: 11:00am–2:00pm 2 people
  Friday: 2:00–6:00 pm 2 people
Oct 11 Saturday: 8:00 am–11:00 am 2 people
  Saturday: 11:00am–2:00 pm 2 people
  Saturday: 2:00–6:00pm 2 people

Sign up to volunteer in any position on the convention website.

Special Discounted Air Travel to Convention!
Salt Lake City has a large international airport and travel to and from this location can be direct through a number of other international airports across the country. SAF/CIF have formed a partnership with Delta and American Airlines to offer discounted airfare for convention attendees.

To Book Your Flight with Delta Airlines:

Visit the Delta website, select “Book A Trip,” click on “More Search Options,” and enter the meeting event code (NMHSJ) in the box provided on the Search Flight page. Reservations may also be made by calling Delta Meeting reservations at 1-800-328-1111, Monday through Friday during the hours of 7:00 am–7:00 pm CDT.

To Book Your Flight with American Airlines:

Visit the American Airlines website, select your flight options, use discount code 79H4BR, and select “Book Now” to make your flight reservation.

Note: To avoid a ticketing charge, make your American Airline reservations online.

For comprehensive convention travel information, visit the SAF Convention website.

Book Your Hotel Room Early

Go to the SAF convention website and click on the "Reservations" link.

2014 SAF/CIF Call for Posters

In 2014, SAF will partner with the Canadian Institute of Forestry/l'Institut forestier du Canada (CIF/IFC) for our national convention. In addition, the convention will be co-located with the International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO) World Congress.

Click here for more information about the 2014 convention. Click here for information on submitting a poster abstract.

Poster submissions deadline: September 1, 2014

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4. Picture the Past

Forestry has an incredible visual legacy, but countless images now reside in archival obscurity or are moldering in closets or storage buildings. The Journal of Forestry has created an opportunity to preserve and share these images in a new feature, “Picture the Past,” and invites you to contribute your images and related stories to remind us of our shared heritage and the lessons learned over the last century.

Guidelines for "Picture the Past" contributions can be found here, and examples can be found in the January and March issues. Submit your photo and related story online or by email to Matthew Walls.

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About The E-Forester:

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The E-Forester is sent to SAF members in good standing each week.

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